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The WiKID Blog

Viewing posts from January, 2009

ted-stevens-site-hacked-by-irony

Hot off the tubes:

Almost as freaky as his infamously disjointed "series-of-tubes" speech last year about the Internet (which briefly earned him the Most Lampooned Politician on the Web award), Stevens's reelection site asks visitors to enter a username and password and then -- as they unsuccessfully fumble for a password -- condemns them with a warning that begins:

banks-seek-tighter-security-from-vendors

According to today's WSJ, 6 big US banks and BITS will announce security standards for their vendors. This action shouldn't come as a surprise, since the banks are essentially following in the footsteps of VISA and Mastercard and their CISP/PCI standards that attempt to secure the credit card industry - especially since the banks own VISA and Mastercard.

better-password-strength-just-one-factor

Pete over at Spire Security points out the obvvious(which alluded me):

As far as I can tell, Bruce Schneier's current Wired column, MySpace Passwords Aren't So Dumb, is intended to be taken seriously. The article is supposed to be about how "good" passwords on MySpace are these days, and there isn't a hint of irony in his statement:
"But seriously, passwords are getting better."
I am at a loss to explain how he can come to this conclusion when every single one of the 34,000 passwords he analyzed were stolen through a phishing attack. What he should have said was: "This shows that a 1-character password (the shortest they harvested) is just as secure as a 32-character password (the longest they harvested)"
He also points out that if you're not going to do two-factor authentication, then don't worry about long passwords. If any data is important enough or vulnerable enough to require a strong and therefore annoying password policy, use two-factor authentication.

the-choicepoint-of-johns

Of course, it makes complete sense. From the Freakonomics blog, an interview with an "escort":

Q. Do you typically know the true identity of your clients, and if so, how?

i-for-one-welcome-our-ceylon-overlords

From the Register:

A US defence department advisory board has warned of the danger that American war robots scheduled for delivery within a decade might be riddled with malicious code. The kill machines will use software largely written overseas, and it is feared that sinister forces might meddle with it in production, thus gaining control of the future mechanoid military.

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